Arrest Process

An arrest may be referred to as the process wherein a person is taken into police custody because of taking an action that is prohibited by law. When a prosecutor doubts that someone may be guilty of a crime and files for information, an arrest may also happen once a warrant of arrest has been issued by a judge. People who have been taken into police custody of course may be given a public Los Angeles criminal lawyer. Otherwise, the arrestee may come up with his own Los Angeles criminal attorney in his defense.

The process of arrest requires the right of the arrestee to exercise their rights, also referred to as the Miranda Rights at any time, as per the 1966 US Supreme Court Ruling entitled: Miranda vs. Arizona, which states that any evidence gathered from the questioning cannot be used against the person under arrest if they have not been informed of their rights prior to the police interview or the arrest.

It is very important for people under arrest to remember the following:

1. During your arrest, your rights have to be read to you. Before even being submitted to questioning, the police officer must inform you of our rights such as the right to remain silent, the fact that anything you say may be held against you, etc.

2. Before and during the process of questioning, you have to make sure that you first consult with a Los Angeles criminal lawyer. In the event that you do not have enough money to afford the services of a Los Angeles criminal attorney, you will be given the services of a Los Angeles criminal attorney for free by the officers.

Aside from knowing your Miranda rights during arrest, having a good Los Angeles criminal lawyer by your side when taken into custody is also important. To ensure that your rights are protected, it is recommended that you get your own Los Angeles criminal attorney. Bear in mind that hiring a trusted Los Angeles criminal attorney, as compared to getting the free services of a pubic attorney, may give you a stronger defense, most especially during court hearings.